What to Do if You Encounter ICE at Work, Home, or in the Streets

What to Do if You Encounter ICE at Work, Home, or in the Streets

Between constant changes in immigration policy and increased reports of immigration raids throughout the country, it’s worth knowing your rights if you encounter ICE: 

AT HOME

·     You do not need to open the door: You have the most amount of rights at home. You do not have to open the door to your home to let officers in unless they have a warrant signed by a judge. If an officer claims to have one, you can ask that he place it up to your window, peep hole, or slide it under your door so that you can look at it. If any of the information on it is incorrect (i.e. your name is misspelled or your address is wrong), it is not a valid warrant.

·     You have the right to remain silent: If you choose to exercise your right to remain silent, simply say so out loud. You do not need to sign anything. If you do choose to speak to the officers, do not lie or show them any fake papers; and you still do not need to open your door if you choose to speak to them. You also do not need to tell them what country you’re from, how you entered the U.S., nor do you need to show them any documents that prove your identity. 

·     You have the right to speak to a lawyer: Even if you do not have a lawyer, you can tell the officers that you want to speak to a lawyer. 

 

AT WORK

·     You have a right to remain silent: If you choose to exercise your right to remain silent, simply say so out loud. You do not need to sign anything. 

·     You have a right to call your lawyer: If you do not have a lawyer, you can still tell the officers that you want to speak to a lawyer 

·     You can refuse to show documents that identify your home country: If you’re asked to state your immigration status, and/or asked to stand in a line based on immigration status, you can refuse to do so

·     You shouldn’t run away, but you can ask if you’re free to go: Immigration officers may enter the public places at your job, but they need a valid warrant or your employer’s consent in order to enter the private places at your job, such as doors that require a security badge or passcode.

 

IN PUBLIC

·     You have a right to remain silent: If you choose to exercise your right to remain silent, simply say so out loud. You do not need to sign anything. 

·     You can refuse a search if you’re not under arrest: You shouldn’t run or make any sudden movements. If you’re stopped but are not arrested, you can refuse a search, however, an officer can pat down your clothes if he suspects you may have a weapon. 

·     You can call your lawyer or your consulate: If you are taken into custody/detained, you have the right to immediately call a lawyer. If you don’t have a lawyer, you can still say you want to speak to one, and/or you can ask to contact your consulate for help finding a lawyer. 

Got immigration-related questions or want to learn more about Brazen Legal? Visit brazenlegal.com

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